Freezing Eggs for Later

I know I owe everyone a catch up post.   All of the babies are getting huge and hard to pin down and the holidays are over.  But I’m still swamped with a lot of ‘real life’ issues.

Instead, I thought I would address a question that I asked recently by one of my steady egg customers.

She asked, “can you freeze eggs for later use?”

I’ll start by saying that I’ve never heard of people doing that before and it sounds kind of weird.   But apparently, it’s do-able!

The easiest way to do it is to put them in ice trays, sprayed lightly with coconut oil or non-stick spray to make them easy to get out.  They will, apparently, last up to a year in your standard home refrigerator freeze.

FREEZING EGGS

If you have more eggs than you can use within a few weeks of buying them, you can break them out of their shells and freeze them. Freeze only clean, fresh eggs.

WHITES

Break and separate the eggs, one at a time, making sure that no yolk gets in the whites. Pour the whites into freezer containers, seal tightly, label with the number of egg whites and the date, and freeze. For faster thawing and easier measuring, first freeze each white in a standard ice cube tray. Then transfer to a freezer container.

YOLKS

The gelation property of egg yolk causes it to thicken or gel when frozen, so you need to give yolks special treatment. If you freeze them as they are, egg yolks will eventually become so gelatinous that they will be almost impossible to use in a recipe. To help retard this gelation, beat in either 1/8 teaspoon salt or 1 1/2 teaspoons sugar or corn syrup per 1/4 cup of egg yolks (about 4 yolks). Label the container with the number of yolks, the date, and whether you’ve added salt (for main dishes) or sweetener (for baking or desserts). Freeze.

WHOLE EGGS

Beat just until blended, pour into freezer containers, seal tightly, label with the number of eggs and the date, and freeze.

HARD-BOILED EGGS

You can freeze hard-boiled egg yolks to use later for toppings or garnishes. Carefully place the yolks in a single layer in a saucepan and add enough water to come at least 1 inch above the yolks. Cover and quickly bring just to boiling. Remove the pan from the heat and let the yolks stand, covered, in the hot water about 12 minutes. Remove the yolks with a slotted spoon, drain them well and package them for freezing. It’s best not to freeze hard-boiled whole eggs and hard-boiled whites because they become tough and watery when frozen.

(source: The Incredible Edible Egg)

Other Good Sources and Tips:

What To Do With Your Extra Eggs – The Back Yard Chicken Forum

How to Freeze Eggs for Cooking to Make them Last Longer – Huffington Post

Freezing Fresh Eggs – Fresh Eggs Daily

 

Miracle Max


So this feather baby is the only one who has a name right now.  

Miracle Max.  Or Maxie. If it’s a girl. 

My poor little miracle baby somehow managed to wander outside while Ashley was sitting on the last unhatched egg.  And got cold.  So cold that he/she was in deaths door when I found him this evening.  

I scooped him up and cupped him in my hands for warm, carried him inside and tucked him under Ashley.  He was breathing, but weak and chilled.  I figured that his only hope was body heat and the company of his siblings.  

I was right.  By lock up time, Max was up and around, playing with his siblings and eating chick starter.  

Truly a miracle baby.  

(Name courtesy of The Princess Bride.)  

Adventures in Egg Laying

The Mystery Bin Chicks are growing up and trying new things.  They are seventeen and a half weeks old now, and I guess that it’s time.

The last time I posted, I mentioned that Stacey has been investigating all the laying boxes and making mini nests.

I got a cool video of her digging her way into one of the nests, building the sides up really high.  She likes deep beds she can hide in.

I posted it on Instagram but I will share here, too.

She went on to lay her first egg later that day.

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Stacey’s first egg. 🙂
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Stacey’s egg (right), Rhode Island Red egg (left)

Stacey is a neurotic new layer. Every morning she jumps into every single empty laying bed, fusses and digs and then hops out.  Nest after nest until, finally, she goes into the nest she laid her first egg in and lays the egg.  I don’t know what she’s looking for and not finding in those other nests, but it’s becoming her new morning ritual.

Sadly, in her attempts to find a good place to lay, she caused trouble I did not need.

I took Abby out of her broody bed, as usual, not thinking that anything would happen.  Stacey came along right behind me and jumped into Abby’s nest. She knocked one egg out of the nest (it broke) and stepped on another.  I got her out, put her in another bed with much scolding and went straight to find Abby, interrupted her dirt bath, and plopped her back on the nest.

Now, I’m not letting Abby out every morning any more.  Maybe every other day and during times when Stacey is done laying her egg.  I’m so heartbroken over the eggs lost.  Mickey and I had just candled them (yes, I broke down and bought a candler) to see if all the other badness could be overcome.  The only upside is that the eggs lost were two I had question marked because I didn’t think they were developing. I won’t, however, be risking any more eggs in that manner.

This morning, right around the same time Stacey was doing her morning bed inspections, one of the other little girls, Candy, climbed into a nest and began rearranging.

Again, I have video on Instagram.  Here it is…ourhappy homemaker.

I checked back later and found the tiniest little egg there.

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Candy’s First Egg
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Candy’s Egg (right), Stacey’s Egg (left)
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Candy’s egg (right), Stacey’s egg (middle), Rhode Island Red egg (left)
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Candy’s Egg (right), Rhode Island Red Egg (left)

No matter how you slice it, Candy’s egg is small.  🙂

Last but not least…

Here are some random visitors to the barnyard…

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A toad who’s been visiting the run. We usually find him on the side of the gate.
Flutter by Butterfly
Flutter by Butterfly

The time of New Eggs Approacheth

This year’s spring chicks are 17 weeks old this week. There are quite a few of them whose wattles and comb are getting bigger and redder.  

Yesterday, I noted that someone had been tearing apart the laying beds on the far side of the coop.  The side that used to be the Grow Up coop.  

I watched them a little in the afternoon and observed one of the pullets checking out the beds.  She walked the length of coop, sticking her head in the nests and looking around.  

Today, she brought a couple of friends with her.  

Abby was 17 weeks when she started laying.  She was my only layer for weeks.  Then her sexlink sisters started, and lastly, after all the rest of the Boys were sent to Freezer Camp, the RiR girls started. 

I don’t expect this year’s girls follow Abby’s ambitious footsteps but I can definitely see signs that I may someday soon be finding little pullet eggs in the nests alongside those of the big girls.  

It’s coming.  The eggs are coming.  

Broody Watch 5.0

Well, as of this morning, there are three babies hiding under Claire’s considerable red fluff.

The last couple of days, Claire has been a real sweetheart compared to how she normally is.  A part of the ‘broody trance’ stage, she let me pet her, feed her by hand, and lift her up to look at the eggs/babies.   Now that more of them have hatched, the broody trance is giving way to ‘Mama Mode’ and Claire’s true personality is asserting itself.

That is to say, I got bit 5 times trying to get these pictures and video.

Ouch!

There is one last egg, the paler one I mentioned was cracked already.  It’ still cracked, but the crack is bigger.

Claire shows no signed of giving up on it yet, and keeps tucking it underneath her like she’s expecting something.

As tomorrow is Day 21 for that egg and one of the other (already hatched) chicks, I’ll wait and see what she does next.  They have that saying about it – Mama Knows – so if Claire is still waiting for a chick, maybe I should, too?

Then again, it’ been cracked since Monday and no signs of anything coming out, movement, or cheeping.

But I’ll let Claire make that call.  If she abandons the egg in favor of caring for the Wee Ones, I’ll know.